Category Archives: Real Estate

Antioch-South Nashville, TN Real Estate: Newly Listed Homes for Sale

The houses for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville are just a small portion of more than 4 million homes sold in Tennessee. and across the United States every year. We’re not just talking listed homes for sale, either. We’re talking about homes for sale — that sell.

Looking for a home to buy? Or do you just like looking at what homes are on the market? Either way, here are the latest homes for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville listed by our partners at realtor.com.

The houses for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville are just a small portion of more than 4 million homes sold in Tennessee. and across the United States every year. We’re not just talking listed homes for sale, either. We’re talking about homes for sale — that sell.

Looking for a home to buy? Or do you just like looking at what homes are on the market? Either way, here are the latest homes for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville listed by our partners at realtor.com.

The houses for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville are just a small portion of more than 4 million homes sold in Tennessee. and across the United States every year. We’re not just talking listed homes for sale, either. We’re talking about homes for sale — that sell.

Looking for a home to buy? Or do you just like looking at what homes are on the market? Either way, here are the latest homes for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville listed by our partners at realtor.com.

The houses for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville are just a small portion of more than 4 million homes sold in Tennessee. and across the United States every year. We’re not just talking listed homes for sale, either. We’re talking about homes for sale — that sell.

Looking for a home to buy? Or do you just like looking at what homes are on the market? Either way, here are the latest homes for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville listed by our partners at realtor.com.

The houses for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville are just a small portion of more than 4 million homes sold in Tennessee. and across the United States every year. We’re not just talking listed homes for sale, either. We’re talking about homes for sale — that sell.

Looking for a home to buy? Or do you just like looking at what homes are on the market? Either way, here are the latest homes for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville listed by our partners at realtor.com.

The houses for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville are just a small portion of more than 4 million homes sold in Tennessee. and across the United States every year. We’re not just talking listed homes for sale, either. We’re talking about homes for sale — that sell.

Looking for a home to buy? Or do you just like looking at what homes are on the market? Either way, here are the latest homes for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville listed by our partners at realtor.com.

The houses for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville are just a small portion of more than 4 million homes sold in Tennessee. and across the United States every year. We’re not just talking listed homes for sale, either. We’re talking about homes for sale — that sell.

Looking for a home to buy? Or do you just like looking at what homes are on the market? Either way, here are the latest homes for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville listed by our partners at realtor.com.

The houses for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville are just a small portion of more than 4 million homes sold in Tennessee. and across the United States every year. We’re not just talking listed homes for sale, either. We’re talking about homes for sale — that sell.

Looking for a home to buy? Or do you just like looking at what homes are on the market? Either way, here are the latest homes for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville listed by our partners at realtor.com.

The houses for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville are just a small portion of more than 4 million homes sold in Tennessee. and across the United States every year. We’re not just talking listed homes for sale, either. We’re talking about homes for sale — that sell.

Looking for a home to buy? Or do you just like looking at what homes are on the market? Either way, here are the latest homes for sale in and around Antioch-South Nashville listed by our partners at realtor.com.

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NBC analysts rip Chiefs: ‘No excuse losing to the Tennessee Titans’

They didn’t sugar coat this.

NBC had the broadcast of the second playoff game on Saturday, and at halftime of the Falcons-Rams game, the studio crew broke down the Chiefs’ 22-21 loss to the Titans.

Tony Dungy and Rodney Harrison offered some harsh criticism of the Chiefs’ performance in the AFC Wild Card Game at Arrowhead Stadium. Dungy, the former Buccaneers and Colts coach, was asked about the Chiefs’ play calling.

“I didn’t like it after they got off their script,” Dungy said. “The first 15 plays, they were aggressive, play-action passes, taking the ball down field. After that, I felt they lost their aggressiveness. I know Travis Kelce got hurt, but I didn’t see that same aggressiveness.”

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Rodney Harrison clearly didn’t hold back in his analysis.

“No excuse losing to the Tennessee Titans,” Harrison said. “This is the worst team in the playoffs, I felt like. And I also felt like you have a home game, you got a chance to rest your players last week. No excuse losing this one.”

Dan Patrick added one last shot: “Yeah, I wondered where Kareem Hunt was in the second half.”

Here is the clip:

Pete Grathoff: 816-234-4330, @pgrathoff

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Tennessee Recruiting: Vols offer five star linebacker out of California

Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports

Pruitt is looking to get in on this top 2019 prospect.

As we focus on what this new staff is going to do with the remaining spots left in the 2018 recruiting class, Jeremy Pruitt and company are looking even further ahead. It’s important to remember that Pruitt isn’t just working from behind with the 2018 class, but the 2019 class as well.

They’re working on playing catch up on both classes. Yesterday, five star linebacker Henry To’oto’o tweeted that he had received an offer from the Tennessee Volunteers.

To’oto’o is 247’s 25th rated prospect of the 2019 class currently. The 6-2, 210 pound linebacker is a California native, playing his high school ball in Concord. Alabama, Oregon, UCLA, Notre Dame, Washington and a host of others are in on To’oto’o.

I’m fascinated to see how Pruitt and his staff perform on the trail with a full year to really get things going. They’re laying the groundwork now. We’ll see how much progress they can make with next year’s class over the summer months.

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Deadly Flu Arrives In Middle Tennessee

NASHVILLE, TN — A deadly strain of the flu already widespread in several nearby states is making headway in Middle Tennessee.

The H3N2 virus that spread out of East and Southeast Asia into Australia and New Zealand has followed the typical seasonal flu pathway and is now into North America. The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention said the virus is already widespread in the Tennessee border states of Virginia, Georgia, Mississippi, and Arkansas, along with Louisiana and Oklahoma. The latest CDC update puts three other Tennessee border states – Kentucky, Missouri and Alabama – in the "regional outbreak" classification. For now, the Volunteer State is one level lower – "local cases" – but doctors say the virus is closing in.

"We anticipate a rather heavy flu season that will probably disproportionately affect older persons. That’s what this strain does," Vanderbilt University Medical Center infectious disease specialist Dr. William Schaffner told WKRN.

Schaffner said he anticipates a stronger-than-usual flu season with the strain disproportionately affecting people 65 and older.

Schaffner said, of course, the obvious step everyone can take is getting the flu vaccine, which is he told the station is "good" this year, but is likely to be more effective in young people, though even if it is not 100 percent preventative will make the infection milder.

Image via Shutterstock

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New housing development taking shape in North Johnson City

Once the site of a thriving family owned and operated dairy farm, the 250-plus acre community has transformed into a serene housing community,

Rather than sell the land to residential or commercial developers, Michael Garland and his family opted to keep the land and develop it based on their own vision, with the first seven lots sold in 1995.

“We’ve developed as the economy and our family felt comfortable. We’re not in a position that we have to be in. (We don’t have) the sense of urgency that other developers maybe have because the land has been in the family for so many years,” Garland said.

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“Obviously, there is a sense of urgency that we want to sell the lot, but we’ve been slower to take on those sections of infrastructure.”

Now, over 20 years later, the Garlands’ land houses roughly 50 families in 50 homes, with more land — The Terrace at Garland Farm Estates — just hitting the market.

Consisting of 24 lots, the Terrace is situated on a pastoral hillside with an unobstructed view and a forest nearby.

Garland said two homes are already under construction in his newest addition with another ready to break ground soon.

Located rather centrally to downtown Kingsport and Johnson City, the Terrace comes with a 2,000-square-foot community clubhouse, which has a kitchen, fireplace, bath facilities and an exercise room coming soon. In addition, the housing development will feature a 2,500-square-foot pool, a basketball court, a tennis court and a children’s playground.

In addition to benefitting the family, the Garland development will also help bolster the tax rolls of Washington County and Johnson City and local real estate activity.

“Coming from a development standpoint, there’s a lot of activity in the county right now, but there is not as much in the activity in the city,” Garland said.

“I think our development is only one of maybe three or four that are really active right now in (Johnson City). There really is just a handful of developments that are bringing new home sites online right now.”

Garland estimated each new home built in the development would generate an additional $2,000 and $2,500 for the county and city each year, respectively.

First purchased in 1926, Michael’s grandfather Jesse Garland first cultivated the land and eventually established a dairy farm, which eventually grew to over 300 head of cattle.

The Garlands’ farm was actually one of the first farms in the region to introduce no-till corn as a way to preserve the topsoil.

In 1966, David Garland was given the Tennessee Outstanding Young Farmer award by the Tennessee Jaycees. He later served as chairman for the Washington County Soil Conservation District and was a member of the Governor’s Council on Agriculture and Forestry in Tennessee.

“Obviously, we grew all the crops we could to minimize what we actually had to purchase. So the land has been cropped for hay, corn and different crops over the course of the years,” Michael Garland said.

To learn more the land for sale at Garland Farm Estates, visit www.garlandfarmestates.com. or call 1-866-688-6432.

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The Redevelopment Of Antioch TN Has Made The Neighbourhood Flourish

Wow do I remember going to Hickory Hollow Mall. It isn’t named that anymore I see, as it is called Commons at the Crossings. Through that transition, it appears that the neighborhood of Antioch had a really difficult time economically. Now, however, a redevelopment and resurgence of that area has meant significant improvement in regards to the economy. In fact, that area of the neighborhood of Antioch is now said to be the 2nd largest employment center in the city of Nashville.

I can imagine that there are all kinds of new stores and restaurants there now. It is a nice area of Nashville, but it was so heavily reliant upon it’s mall. It is no secret that malls are struggling nationwide, and that didn’t help matters. Not all redevelopments of areas that housed malls are going to flourish right away either.

In the case of Antioch, it worked out great. It is amazing how the area was able to turn around that quickly. I will tell you what though. I remember going to Hickory Hollow Mall, and it was a fun time for sure. Now Hickory Hollow Mall is just memories because as mentioned, it was replaced by Commons at the Crossings. In this instance, the area took on new strip malls and individual stores.

It is interesting how a change of landscape with new stores in a different setting makes such a big difference. Antioch is now set to thrive for years to come and be part of the growth of Nashville. It also seems like it is going to be one major traffic jam. It’s a good traffic jam though, and now they can work on that issue. Whether you live in Antioch or not, it also seems like a great place to get a good job.

Plans to build Antioch charter school one step closer to reality

Rocketship Education’s proposal to build a charter school in Antioch has moved closer to becoming a reality.

ANTIOCH — Plans to open another charter school in Antioch advanced this month with planning commissioners’ endorsement of the proposal.

The Antioch Planning Commission forwarded Rocketship Public Schools’ construction project to the city for final approval, recommending in a 5-0 vote Nov. 1 that council members rezone the Cavallo Road site to allow construction of an elementary school campus.

Commissioners also were unanimous on several other fronts: They advised the City Council to issue Rocketship the conditional use permit the city requires of all schools before they can open, as well as to accept the nonprofit’s state-mandated analysis of the project’s environmental effects.

In addition, they agreed that the city should allow the school to erect a 6-foot wrought-iron fence along the front of its property.

The Redwood City-based organization, formerly known at Rocketship Education, already has bought the 1.7-acre site at 1700 Cavallo Road, where a now-vacant office building housed the East County Times until the newspaper relocated to a Lone Tree Way business park this summer.

Rocketship plans to demolish the structure and replace it with a 31,052-square-foot, two-story campus that will accommodate up to 600 students from 4-year-olds in transitional kindergarten to fifth-graders.

The charter school network currently operates 18 schools in three states and Washington, D.C.; it’s aiming to open the Antioch campus in August 2018.

This would be the third charter school in the city; the two others are K-8 facilities, one of which leases space on the Contra Costa County Fairgrounds. The other, located on Hacienda Way, uses district buildings along with portable classrooms that the school itself bought.

Although charter schools are publicly funded, state law allows them more independence than traditional schools in the curriculum they offer and other aspects of their operation as a way to encourage innovation.

Planning commission Chairwoman Janet Zacharatos likes the fact that Rocketship’s focus is serving children who have been attending low-performing schools in poor neighborhoods.

“Their (test) scores are very impressive compared to what Antioch Unified’s scores are,” she said, adding that the nonprofit operation is effective in encouraging parents to help out in classrooms and otherwise take an active role in their child’s education.

Although Rocketship schools are open to students anywhere, those in the Antioch Unified School District will have priority.

Rocketship will start accepting applications Nov. 15. At the beginning of this month it already had received 480 forms from parents within the district indicating they intend to enroll their child, and more than 200 from families elsewhere, said Marie Gil, Rocketship’s Bay Area regional director.

There will be a lottery in March.

Parking and crime were among the concerns that arose during last week’s discussion of the project.

City staff members advised planning commissioners against approving the 49 parking spaces that Rocketship plans to provide on site, saying it wouldn’t be enough to accommodate both employees and visitors unless the school reduces enrollment from 600 to 400 students.

In addition, Police Chief Tammany Brooks has voiced doubts about building a school in one of the city’s highest crime areas.

The police department last year logged 431 calls for service within a ¼-mile radius of the Cavallo Road and East 18th St. intersection, where there is a liquor store as well as a mini-mart that sells alcohol. Two motels and apartments are also in the immediate area.

The findings prompted the city to install three surveillance cameras at that spot.

The police department recommended that Rocketship hire two armed security guards to monitor the area while parents are dropping off children and picking them up.

But the organization objected, saying in a memo that the presence of weapons “communicates the wrong message to both our families and students.”

“To have an armed security guard at an elementary school essentially validates the misconception that communities that have … higher incidents of poverty require a higher level of security,’’ Gil said.

She noted that after Rocketship opened its Washington, D.C. school, crime in the area actually decreased.

Gil added that her organization will track the number of times it has to call police and keep written records of incidents to determine whether the neighborhood around the Antioch school improves as well.

Rocketship compromised by agreeing to include security personnel — without weapons — among its security measures, which range from equipping every window with motion sensors connected to the alarm system and tightly controlling visitors’ access to the campus to installing surveillance cameras that the receptionist can monitor.

As to the question of parking, the Planning Commission decided that the school could operate with 49 parking spaces and 600 children.

The City Council is scheduled to vote on the recommendations at its meeting Tuesday; if it adopts them, Rocketship can apply for a building permit.

The council meets at 7 p.m. at City Hall, 200 H St.

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New workforce housing announced for Sevier Co.

Photo from December 6, 2016 of the Lodge at Buckberry Creek after the Gatlinburg fires.

PIGEON FORGE, Tenn. (WATE) – Sevier County announced they are building new workforce housing, designed to help the many people affected by last November’s deadly wildfires, which destroyed than 2,500 structures.

According to the Tennessee Housing Development Agency, the $15 million for the project over ten years comes from a pool of tax credits that the agency set aside to help build affordable housing.

THDA executive director Ralph Perrey described the importance of the project, which he says will benefit the driving work force in Sevier County.

“That has always been an important part for this community, because you have a lot of folks who work hard, but don’t necessarily make a great deal of money because they are employed seasonally,” said Perrey. “But they do important things in the community. They are an important part of the economic engine of Sevier County. And we want them to have affordable, safe places to live that are also close to the places where they are going to work.

THDA says there will be two sites, one just north of Smokies Stadium in Kodak that includes 80 units. The units will be one, two and three bedrooms with a playground, community room and computer area. The other site will be in Gatlinburg and will be comprised of 60 units.

Work will begin in next summer and leases will start in the fall of 2018.

For the first time in more than a decade, a Knoxville…

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Tennessee towns bracing for upcoming white nationalist rallies

Authorities and city officials in two Tennessee towns are bracing for possible clashes on Saturday when protesters and counter-protesters take to the streets for scheduled white nationalist rallies.

The "White Lives Matter" rallies were organized by white nationalist group League of the South, according to city officials, and are scheduled to take place Saturday in the cities of Murfreesboro and Shelbyville, located south of Nashville. Counter-protesters are also expected on the day of the rallies, officials said.

The rally will focus on issues such as last month’s deadly church shooting in Antioch, Tennessee, illegal immigration and refugee settlement in Middle Tennessee, the Shelby Police Department said in a press release.

Officials are asking that demonstrators on both sides "respect each other’s rights and respect the role of law enforcement in maintaining and peace and discouraging aggressive behavior, said Shelbyville City Manager Shanna Boyette in a video streamed on Facebook Friday.

Residents who live and work near protest sites are encouraged to err on the side of caution and avoid the areas, if possible.

League of the South President Michael Hill informed Shelbyville city officials that the group intended to hold a sidewalk rally on Oct. 28, according to a press release. Such a gathering does not require a permit or approval from the city.

In a statement, Hill instructed protesters to "obey all authorities charged with keeping public order," The Wall Street Journal reported.

“Stand your ground, speak your mind and proclaim your message, but do not initiate physical contact with anyone who opposes you,” he said. “Engage in violence, and at the proper level, only in defense of your own person, that of your compatriots, and your property.”

In downtown Murfreesboro, the League of the South is expected to be joined by other affiliated groups in its rally, the city said in a release.

Murfreesboro is home to Middle Tennessee State University, where resident halls will be locked due to the rally beginning Friday at 5 p..m. through Monday at 8 a.m., the university said in a press release.

"As the sixth fastest-growing mid-size community in the nation and home to MTSU, the largest undergraduate university in Tennessee, the city and county are proud of the community we are building and the diversity of its residents," the city press release stated.

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation will be present at the rallies and "visible as a show of force and support for local law enforcement agencies," said TBI Director Mark Gwyn in a statement.

Both cities stated that they have a responsibility to protect free speech rights and those who seek to exercise those rights.

"Given the recent incidents in our country surrounding protest and counter-protests, the city is taking very seriously multiple concerns regarding the safety of expected protesters, counter-protesters, the public, and the protection of private and public property from damage," Shelbyville officials said.

A white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August turned violent when a car plowed through a group of demonstrators.

Last week, Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in response to Richard Spencer’s speech at the University of Florida. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has not declared a state of emergency, but state authorities will be in close contact with local police, the Wall Street Journal reported.

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Antioch woman convicted of using Alabama inmates’ info for tax returns

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – An Antioch woman was convicted in federal court of using the personal information of Alabama state prisoners to file fraudulent tax returns.

It was an elaborate scheme that went on for at least two years.

The woman, Monique Annette Ellis, doesn’t have a criminal record in Tennessee and since has yet to be sentenced.

Her fake tax return scheme came to an end when U.S. Marshal raided her Antioch apartment.

Eight prisoners locked up in Alabama had no idea their personal information was being used in Tennessee.

“In this case, she received, somehow, and we don’t know how, the identity of eight inmates from the Alabama Department of Corrections and used those names, date of births, and social security numbers and file fraudulent tax returns for those inmates,” said Don Cochran, the newly-appointed United State Attorney for the Middle Tennessee District.

(Photo: WKRN)

The inmates didn’t receive a dime.

Federal attorneys said Ellis used her Antioch apartment to file the fake returns. During a raid of her home, agents confiscated computers, paperwork with the inmates’ personal information, and Ellis’ personal bank records.

She is alleged to have filed those returns electronically using Turbo Tax software.

According to her 16-count indictment, all the $1,464 refund amounts were identical, with the exception of two that were $21 less.

“There were a number of similarities the amounts were close to each other. The jobs she listed on the tax returns were all similar,” Cochran said.

(Photo: WKRN)

Ellis was convicted in federal court Tuesday on all charges, eight counts of wire fraud and eight counts of aggravated identity theft.

The U.S. Attorney’s office said this conviction sends a clear message.

“Certainly, we’ll prosecute those cases,” Cochran told News 2. “In this case, it involved theft of over $120,000 and the use of eight individuals that were stolen and used to defraud the government of that amount of money.”

U.S. attorneys say Ellis also used banks accounts with her minor son’s name as well as her adult son, who they said is mentally challenged, to deposit some of the money, and then she wrote checks to herself.

Those Alabama prisoners were not aware Ellis was using their personal information to file those tax returns. They were told about it once the government began their investigation.

The maximum sentence for wire fraud is 20 years on each count, and there’s a mandatory two-year sentence for aggravated identity theft.

Ellis will be sentenced in January 9, 2018.

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